Question for Havern

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Question for Havern

Post by Ani on Tue Feb 24, 2009 6:24 pm

Well, this isnt really directed at Havern, so if anyone else can answer, that would be nice.

What is the trick for finding the sum of two adjacent squares?
ie.
33^2 + 34^2 = ?

Thanks


Last edited by Ani on Mon Mar 02, 2009 1:23 am; edited 1 time in total
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Re: Question for Havern

Post by HTang on Wed Feb 25, 2009 11:19 am

No clue. I seem to recall there being a specific trick for that, but it looked ugly, and strangely reminiscent of FOIL, so I didn't bother remembering it.
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Re: Question for Havern

Post by Ani on Wed Feb 25, 2009 8:15 pm

HTang wrote:No clue. I seem to recall there being a specific trick for that, but it looked ugly, and strangely reminiscent of FOIL, so I didn't bother remembering it.

The wierd part is, it appeared on a easy Dr. Numsen(????), so there must be an really easy trick for it. I'll try to beat it to death from now on o.O
2a^2 + 2a + 1 is what I derived where a is the first term, bu then again, this complicated of a trick wouldnt be on an easy numsen.


Last edited by Ani on Mon Mar 02, 2009 1:24 am; edited 1 time in total
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Re: Question for Havern

Post by Ani on Mon Mar 02, 2009 1:10 am

Ani wrote:
HTang wrote:No clue. I seem to recall there being a specific trick for that, but it looked ugly, and strangely reminiscent of FOIL, so I didn't bother remembering it.

The wierd part is, it appeared on a easy Dr. Numsen(????), so there must be an really easy trick for it. I'll try to beat it to death from now on o.O
2a^2 + 2a + 1 is what I derived where a is the first term, bu then again, this complicated of a trick wouldnt be on an easy numsen.

I found out the trick from Dulles. Since a^2 + b^2 = (a - b)^2 + 2ab and b = a + 1. You get:
a^2 + b^2 = (a - (a - 1))^2 + 2ab
and so
the trick is a^2 + b^2 = 2ab + 1 when b = a+1
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Re: Question for Havern

Post by HTang on Tue Mar 03, 2009 11:48 am

Huh. That's kinda cool.
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